Tag Archives: English

A Four Month Report

Happy Eid everyone! I pray you are all enjoying the blessed Eid AlAdha weekend.

As for me, right now, I’m spending the wee hours of the morning in Terminal 2 of the Dubai International Airport (DXB) for my bi-monthly visa turnaround, an attempt to renew my “visitor” visa, hopefully for the last time. Tomorrow marks four months since I’ve landed in Doha, Qatar. Four long, exhausting, fulfilling, exciting and at some point dangerous months. In the last four months, I’ve been caught up with work, trying to get settled into a  place I can call my own and develop some form of a social life.

They call me Doha, Ms. Doha.

As of a few weeks ago, I attempted to get back to my short work outs and walks just to keep my energy level up. Recently I was able to some how get back to reading Aleph by Paulo Coelho which was my first non-food purchase in Qatar. The other day, a cute little kitty followed me half way home and adopted me. With all the time I have on my hands right now before I check out the tiny duty free section, I shall rant away at some of the events that have taken place in my first four months in Qatar…

 

Cool British Accent — After calling a few landlords to inquire about available apartments for rent, I received a text message (or SMS as it’s called here) stating how one very nice man liked my “really cool British accent”. I had to respond because I thought this was a joke but it turns out, that wasn’t the case. I mentioned how I wasn’t British but thanks for the kind words. His exact response (misspellings and all), “I want us to get to know echother more and I promis you I get you discount in very nice apartment. ;-)” I didn’t even know how to respond without being rude so I left it at that. However, a few more call outs over a course of a few days garnered me 3 more similar SMS’ and 2 call backs asking about my marital status.

I did realize that with all of them, I had spoken straight English. To test out the theory that if I spoke in Arabic none of this would’ve happened, I called back some of these same people speaking in my great Egyptian dialect. Of course as always, I was right! Over the course of my search, I now speak only in Arabic unless English is necessary. Now my hurdle is having someone rent out to a single lady but that’s for post.

Right now, I’m not getting much compliments on my British accent.

 

I Swear They’re Real — Shopping and minding my own business one day, I caught a young lady looking me up and down. I flashed her a smile and we exchanged “salams”. No little chit chat, she just straight up asked me, “Where did you get your chest and lips done?”

“God, this is all done by God.”

“They’re real? No silicone? No surgery? Padded bra?” she whispers.

“Nope, just good wholesome fat!” I whispered back giggling with the gal. I showed her that all I’ve had “done” was my lip piercing. She’s still fascinated that I haven’t had any work done. She started telling me about how she’s debating getting her chest done before she gets married. I advised her against it and to work with what she’s got rather than agonize over it. Of course, the decision is hers and I had to remind her that no one gets the final say over her body but her.

Twenty minutes after our conversation, we crossed paths where she flashed me a smile and whispered to another lady walking with her. I’m sure she’s caught up on our little conversation. I couldn’t get my wholesome fat ass out of there fast enough.

 

Yes, I Can Be Both — In my recent dealings with people, I’ve noticed this odd form of racism and need for a nationalistic identity. I have friends that were born and raised in Qatar but they can never call themselves Qataris. They don’t even have a Qatari passport and every year must renew their legal status in the country. I know the government is working on changing these laws (for economical and sports reasons) but my question is, “when exactly?” The idea of keeping it as pure as possible is a bit far fetched to the point of silliness in my opinion. Remember, historically the people of Qatar came from either Saudi Arabia or Iran.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for being proud of your nationality, your heritage and it being part of your identity. However, there’s a difference between being proud and being arrogant; enforcing your opinion of one’s identity.

In dealing with Arabs, particularly Egyptian expatriates here in Qatar, they make it seem as if I can only pick one identity, either I’m Egyptian or I’m American. I just look them straight in the face and say, “but I’m both, proudly so.” I’ve even had arguments with random strangers after it was noted that I shouldn’t identify myself as an American.

For the record, I was born in San Francisco, California, USA. My father immigrated from Egypt in the 70’s and my mother followed suit after they got married. To deny myself the right to identify as both an Egyptian American would not be doing myself justice nor my parents for the many dreams they had for their family in America.

Just because most of the world, including Americans believe it or not, don’t agree with some of the American foreign policies, doesn’t mean  that we simply drop our identity as Americans. We are a nation that prides itself in being a melting pot. We come from all over the world, united with ideals and dreams. It is those ideals and dreams that has made the heart and soul of what is good in America today.

So yes, I can be both. I AM Egyptian American.

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LinkedIn Profile Tips

Krista Canfield

Krista Canfield, the Senior Manager at LinkedIn was on San Francisco’s 7Live yesterday with Brian Copeland and Lizzie Bermudez with a few good tips on making your profile stand out. As LinkedIn is my favorite professional networking site out there, felt it necessary to share that information with my readers.

Canfield started by discussing this year’s top over-used “buzz” words. The top five that you and I have been guilty of over-using on our profiles and resumes are:

  1. Creative
  2. Organizational
  3. Effective
  4. Extensive Experience
  5. Track Record

Other overused words were problem-solving, communication skills and interpersonal skills as detailed further on Digital Journal. My advice would be to really look at what your skill is rather then sugar coating it with smart sounding words. Let’s go a bit into detail of what we actually did, using simple English words. For example, what in fact have we created to be creative?

Canfield also stated that users shouldn’t simply say they have a lot of experience but actually list their experience. The more information you have posted on your profile from your resume, the more you are to stand out. Keeping it simple could be keeping you out of reach from many employers looking at your profile. I would also suggest that once you have perfected both your resume and profile, make sure to link your profile when you send out your resume. Why not have it below your name at the bottom of your cover letter?

Curious what my profile looks like? Here it is!

If you are going to have a profile, you need to make yourself approachable. LinkedIn asks asks for one small picture to add personality to your profile. When Bermudez asked what’s the worst profile picture Canfield had seen, she replied, “not having a picture at all is worse then a bad picture.” Of course, she noted, that one should have a simple, professional head shot for their profile picture. My rule of thumb is, if you’d post it on Facebook, maybe you shouldn’t use it on LinkedIn.

As I noted earlier, I too am guilty of some of these mishaps and am fixing up my LinkedIn profile as you read this! If you’d like me to look over your profile, all you have to do is ask.

Once an excerpt video of yesterday’s interview is made available, with permission I’ll be sure to post it right here!