Tag Archives: religious

Two Thirds of My Life, Worn Proudly

This week marks 20 years since I’ve taken the decision to don the hijab.

I’m not posting this rant to celebrate, brag or showcase my sense of religiousness because all of that is mine and mine alone. I am posting this rant because I’ve been asked by many of my readers/followers/fans of all faiths alike why I have donned the hijab and how I’ve stuck to it for so long.

I made this decision on my own at a young age when I learned the basic Islamic guidelines of hijab. So of course, there was a few times where I’ve checked the rear view mirror, reevaluated my decision and came to the realization that hijab was a part of who I am. So much so, that taking it off would not allow me to be myself. Hijab was not a fashion statement of mine -although I am quite fashionable thank you very much- but it’s a part of who I am as a Muslimah, a part of who I am as a person.

the high school look
the high school look

Sticking to it as a teenager wasn’t always easy. However, I didn’t mind having to explain why I was always covered up, that I was not hot in that and no, I didn’t shower while wearing that. I did learn during that time that when one believes strongly in something, one does find themselves making every effort every day towards that belief.

My belief was to be myself. It didn’t matter whether anyone else approved of it or not. It didn’t matter the dictated trend or what everyone else looked like. My belief was to be myself.

I’m loud. I’m spontaneous. I’m family oriented. I laugh at almost anything. I’m very highly educated. I’m happily single. I’m 21 years old for the tenth time. I’m bilingual. I’m multicultural. I’m always hungry. I’m living on my own in another country. I’m too cool to be reckoned with. I’m simply amazing. I’m all that and more in my own hijab.

One of the main reasons for hijab in Islam to be seen for your inner beauty, intellect and soul rather than your outer beauty alone. I know that no matter the look I decide to take-on at any given time, it suits my inner beauty, my intellect and my soul perfectly.

This week marks 20 years since I’ve taken the decision to don the hijab. This week marks two thirds of my life, worn proudly.

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Ramadan in Qatar

It’s been a few weeks now since I’ve moved to Doha, Qatar from San Francisco, California. So far, I’m settling in slowly but surely, taking in this diverse atmosphere and doing my best to survive this ridiculous summer heat. I have gone out and about exploring bits and pieces of Doha which I’m sure you’re aware of from my many posts on Twitter and foursquare. Not sure how much of that is going to continue as Ramadan approaches.

My favorite time of year is about two days away. As I sit trying to figure out what I need to know about Ramadan in Qatar, I was reminded by my weekly email subscription from Friday Nasiha that this will be my first Ramadan alone, away from my family. It’s not going to be like when I was in grad school a few years back and working long hours where I only had iftar at home maybe once or twice a week. It’s not going to be like when I was in Egypt last year constantly surrounded by extended family and friends.

Realizing this has officially made me homesick.

I had to appreciate the efforts with some of the tips for spending Ramadan alone away from family which I’ve reposted below. I am blessed that I would be spending Ramadan in Qatar with friends I deem family however I appreciate and will definitely be utilizing tips #3, #4 and #6!

Are you spending Ramadan alone this year? What tips here work for your situation? Do you have other tips to add on? Any tips for spending Ramadan in Qatar?

Cool Tips!

Lonely Ramadan

For most Muslims, Ramadan is family time. You get up together, eat Iftar together, pray together, etc. But what if you don’t have your family near you?

Waking up in a lonely apartment and eating food you’ve sometimes burnt in an effort to catch Suhur in time are some of the realities of being a single Muslim in Ramadan. But there are ways to make Ramadan special when you’re on your own. Here are few ideas.

1. Establish a Suhur telephone tree
Get a couple of friends together and establish a telephone tree to wake each other up for Suhur. Establish a time to call and a schedule of who will call whom. Make it a little exciting by adding some funny phrases every week that will really wake everyone.

2. Invite people over for Iftar
Even if even you couldn’t eat the food the last time you cooked, invite people over for Iftar. Make it a potluck, order pizza or if you can afford it, get it catered. The food isn’t the thing. The blessing is in the company, and you’ll be rewarded for feeding everyone. Make sure to especially invite those who are away from their families.

3. Attend prayers at the local mosque/MSA
Even if the Imam’s recitation isn’t the best and the behavior of other Muslims can be more than annoying, try to attend Tarawih prayers organized by your local mosque or your Muslim Students’ Association (MSA). While praying alone in peace and quiet is great, praying shoulder-to-shoulder with other Muslims with whom you have nothing in common except your faith is a unique and uplifting experience.

4. Keep the Quran playing when you are alone
It’s often tempting to keep the TV or radio on when we’re alone to avoid the silence. This Ramadan, find a Quran reciter you like and play their recitations during those moments when you want to fill your place with some sound. Choose selections you’d like to memorize, like the 30th part of the Quran.

5. Take care of others
Know a new person at the school/office? Is a friend who lives nearby having problems with their spouse? Or is someone you know having money problems? This Ramadan, reach out with an attentive ear, a generous hand, and most importantly, an open heart to others. Don’t let these small opportunities for gaining blessings slip you by.

6. Pick and pursue Ramadan goals 
Choose at least three goals to pursue this Ramadan. Whether it’s curbing a bad habit or starting a good one, doing this will help you focus and work harder this month to change for the better. It takes 21 days to establish a good habit. With Ramadan, we’ve got 30. Why not make the best of it by picking up the good?

Compiled From:
A single Muslim’s guide to Ramadan” – SoundVision.com

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