Category Archives: Social Media

National Selfie Day

For both #NationalSelfieDay and #ThrowbackThursday, thought I’d share my current (social media) profile picture.

It’s the first selfie I took a few days after arriving home from Qatar last summer. I was still jet lagged, silly excited yet overcome with emotions.

This selfie reminds me that when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade with a little extra sugar. ūüíč Stay silly my friends!

Picture of the Day

Still thinking about the delicious Thai yellow curry chicken with potatoes and purple carrots with a side of seasoned steamed rice my young brother made for the family iftar last week. ūüėč I’m so proud!!

Is Ramadan really ending this week?

In your darkest of days, a pop of color can go a long way. Here’s to a colorful Monday and an even more colorful Ramadan.

#WeAreBetterThanThis

we-are-better-than-this
c/o of WeAreBetterThanThis.com via Mashable.com

It’s disheartening that in 2015, we are urged to sign petitions against discrimination & hatred. We are better than this, because America was built on the backs of our immigrant grandparents & parents. They came to “the land of opportunity” to live a better life for themselves, their children & grandchildren. To live a life of tolerance, acceptance, opportunity and freedom.

Let’s remember this my fellow Americans as we sign this petition today & head to the polls in 2016. Please sign and share!

Two Thumbs Up

“Two Thumbs Up!”

That was the quote I awaited to hear every week on “At the Movies with Siskel and Ebert” when I was young. Roger Ebert’s work was one of the ways I was introduced to American movies when I was young and only really exposed to American TV and Egyptian movies. I learned not only to enjoy a movie, but to appreciate cinema as a whole.

I remember many times going to a movie and thinking, “Ebert was right, these actors were superb.” or “That’s why Ebert gave it a thumbs down, it sucked!”

I agreed with many of his reviews and was an instant fan of his work both written and on television. God bless the internet, Ebert’s work became more easily accessible to a fan living outside the Chicago Sun Times delivery route. From reading his reviews on the web throughout high school to following his tweets¬†on a daily basis. He was not just a critic of the movies, but a critic of the many issues that we faced every day outside the movie theater. He championed indie film makers, supported film festivals and was always heard, loudly. My kind of critic!

By Scott Stantis for the Chicago Tribune

Ebert suffered from cancer in the last few years. It eventually effected his speaking abilities but that never silenced him. He continued to do what he loved best,¬†critiquing¬†movies, and the world, loudly via social media. Yesterday, he posted what is now his last post, “A Leave of Presence” where he basically says, “I’m sick, going to take care of myself but I’m not going to stop doing what I do.”¬†Now when I watch a movie, I’m going to think, “What would Ebert have thought of this one?”

Rest in Peace Ebert. I’ll see you at the movies.

Please also read:
Chicago Sun Times’ Ebert Obituary
Mashable’s Ebert¬†Obituary
Angry Asian Man’s Champion of Asian American Cinema

LinkedIn Profile Tips

Krista Canfield

Krista Canfield, the Senior Manager at¬†LinkedIn was on San Francisco’s 7Live¬†yesterday with Brian Copeland and Lizzie Bermudez¬†with a few good tips on making your profile stand out. As LinkedIn is my favorite professional networking site out there, felt it necessary to share that information with my readers.

Canfield started by discussing this year’s top over-used “buzz” words. The top five that you and I have been guilty of over-using on our profiles and resumes are:

  1. Creative
  2. Organizational
  3. Effective
  4. Extensive Experience
  5. Track Record

Other overused words were problem-solving, communication skills¬†and interpersonal skills¬†as detailed further on¬†Digital Journal. My advice would be to really look at what your skill is rather then sugar coating it with smart sounding words. Let’s go a bit into detail of what we actually did, using simple English words. For example, what in fact have we created to be creative?

Canfield also stated that users shouldn’t simply say they have a lot of experience but actually list their experience. The more information you have posted on your profile from your resume, the more you are to stand out. Keeping it simple could be keeping you out of reach from many employers looking at your profile. I would also suggest that once you have perfected both your resume and profile, make sure to link your profile when you send out your resume. Why not have it below your name at the bottom of your cover letter?

Curious what my profile looks like? Here it is!

If you are going to have a profile, you need to make yourself approachable. LinkedIn asks asks for one small picture to add personality to your profile. When¬†Bermudez asked what’s the worst profile picture Canfield had seen, she replied, “not having a picture at all is worse then a bad picture.” Of course, she noted, that one should have a simple, professional head shot for their profile picture. My rule of thumb is, if you’d post it on Facebook, maybe you shouldn’t use it on LinkedIn.

As I noted earlier, I too am guilty of some of these mishaps and am fixing up my LinkedIn profile as you read this! If you’d like me to look over your profile, all you have to do is ask.

Once an excerpt video of yesterday’s interview is made available, with permission I’ll be sure to post it right here!